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Review the Last Movie You Saw

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I am moving this from The Bronze but with one caveat: now you actually have to review the last movie you saw rather than just listing it.

The Giant Gila Monster (1959)

It was much, much better than I expected. Shots of the lizard and the town drunk were laughable but Don Sullivan did a terrific job. I could have done without the singing and the subplot involving the radio DJ but otherwise it was a fun movie. Definitely worth the watch.

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The Phantom from 10,000 Leagues (1955)

This was not a good movie in any sense. The title, by the wake, refers to a mutated animal that guards a shaft of radioactive light. It is not 10,000 leagues under the sea (which would be impossible) and it is certainly not a phantom (lots of people see, and are killed, but it). It was painfully and hilariously obvious that the phantom was a guy in a suit. And the bad guy? He liked trying to kill people with spear guns.

Seven Women from Hell (1961)

Again, the title made little sense. The seven women were actually six for the bulk of the film and they were not from hell but in hell, captured by the Japanese somewhere in the Philippines and imprisoned. It was not an enjoyable movie, by any means, but it was an adequate story and some of the actresses -- particularly Patricia Owens and Denise Darcel (I think) -- were quite good. Yvonne Craig played a pregnant newlywed and spent much of the movie over emoting.

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Forgetting Sarah Marshall (2008)

Hilarious! Maybe a bit too long at two hours and a few of the supporting characters I felt were superfluous but really, just a fun movie with plenty of laughs, some of it raunchy, and a little male nudity for flavor. Jason Segel was fantastic -- I had no idea he could sing -- and Kristen Bell sparkled and as always and Russell Brand was outrageous but Mila Kunis easily stole the show. I listened to some of the cast and crew commentary on the DVD and it sounds like they had a ball making this movie.

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Tokyo Gore Police

Wow. Not since Snakes on a Plane has a title so accurately summed up a movie. Tokyo locations? Check. Cops? Check. Gore? Holy crap! There was lots of over the top blood and guts in this one. So much, that some viewers may gloss over the Robocop-like TV commercials and ads sprinkled throughout the film that offer some biting social commentary.

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Tokyo Gore Police

Wow. Not since Snakes on a Plane has a title so accurately summed up a movie.

I am still waiting for the sequel, Snakes on a Plane 2: Snakes on a Biplane.

Swing Time (1936)

A second viewing of my favorite Ginger Rogers-Fred Astaire musicals. When they are dancing in the instructional hall and jump over the little fence, that is just incredible. What a fun movie.

Edited by forst

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The Watchmen

Excellent movie. It was IMO the most accurate adaption of a book or graphic novel I've ever seen. Some people actually hate that which to me is surprising.

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I gave it a darn good review for the site. It's surprising and not surprising that a movie of this caliber wouldn't get its due from critics.

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I agree with Teelie... The Watchmen movie is a great adaptation, the best to date... Sin City would be a close second....

If you have a problem with the movie, then you must of had the same issue with the grafic novel. I had said when I saw Sin City, it was like the comic came to life before my eyes... With TheWatchmen I felt that even more...

10 :yeah: out of 10 :yeah:

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The Watchmen

Good movie. Havent read the graphic novel. My gripes - too long and the sex scenes were unnecessary I thought.

The best part: when Rorschach said to the inmates "None of you understand. I'm not locked up in here with you. You're locked up in here with me."

Rorschach stole the show. Good movie :yeah:

Edited by [ace]

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At the Earth's Core (1976)

The special effects were ludicrous. Rubber suits can only do so much and in this case it was not nearly enough. But the movie was enjoyable, thanks to Peter Cushing delightful performance as a somewhat absentminded professor. The lovely Caroline Munro played the requisite love interest; her job was to stand around wearing very little and she did it well.

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The Mask of Fu Manchu (1932)

Nice, atmospheric adventure-movie featuring Boris Karloff as the evil Dr. Fu-Manchu who is hellbent on uniting all asian people under a new Gengis Khan - himself - and conquer the West. The movie certainly doesn't lack for suspense or action; it features people being kidnapped, tortured, shot, stabbed, etcetera. Of course, Karloff is excellent as the titular character, stealing every scene he's in and making the heroes seem rather bland by comparison.

Edited by Dr_Mabuse

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Secret Agent (1936)

An early Hitchcock film, produced between The 39 Steps and Sabotage with a young Peter Lorre, Robert Young and Madeleine Carroll (who was also in The 39 Steps). I watched it online at Hulu.com and the quality was atrocious. About 2/3rds of the way through, though, the sound improved and the image brightened noticeably. Even a pristine print would not make this a masterpiece. I found it fairly plodding and a little dull.

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The Midnight Meat Train

Based on a Clive Barker short story I have never read. The movie was ok. Not scary or frightening and no where near as bloody or gory as I thought it would be, Hell, some of the gore FX were CGI, reminding me of the blood splatters in 300. At times the film seemed drawn out, like it was hard to stretch it to feature film length. Maybe adapting it as an episode of the now defunct Masters of Horror would have been better.

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Secret Agent (1936)

An early Hitchcock film, produced between The 39 Steps and Sabotage with a young Peter Lorre, Robert Young and Madeleine Carroll (who was also in The 39 Steps). I watched it online at Hulu.com and the quality was atrocious. About 2/3rds of the way through, though, the sound improved and the image brightened noticeably. Even a pristine print would not make this a masterpiece. I found it fairly plodding and a little dull.

I've got a Hitchcock DVD collection this movie's a part of. Haven't gotten around to watching anything from it yet, but now I'll be keeping an eye out for this one...

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Fantomas: In the Shadow of the Guillotine (1913)

The first out of five silent-film serials Louis Feuillade made based on the "Fantomas" books by writers Allain & Souvestre. Feuillade's "Fantomas" has been called the first great movie experience and after having watched the first two installments it's easy to see why. Granted, "Shadow" axes most of the subplots from the first book and begins with Fantomas robbing princess Sonia Danidoff in her Hotel-Room. Feuillade has also changed the ending, making it less morbid than in the book. Still, this is a great piece of cinematic history that does an admirable job in introducing us to the three main characters; the master-criminal himself as well as the heroes, Inspector Juve and the journalist Fandor. Well done, monsieur Feuillade, well done.

Juve vs. Fantomas (1913)

The second installment in Feuillade's "Fantomas" series is both longer, bigger and better than the first. This is a remarkably modern film, filled to the brim with suspense and action. Within minutes after escaping a fatal train-accident, arranged by Fantomas, the heroic duo of Juve and Fandor finds themselves fighting for the lives admidst the raging inferno of a burning distillery. The finale is spectacular as well, leaving Fantomas on top and me wanting more.

More to come as soon as I've watched the remaining three movies.

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The Monster that Challenged the World (1957)

This was so much better than it has any right to be. For such a silly premise (giant killer mollusks!?) the acting in the film was actually quite good. Tim Holt and Hans Conried were especially good; Audrey Dalton did what she could with the requisite role of the love interest but her character was little more than eye candy. Good eye candy, but eye candy nonetheless. Barbara Darrow had a small role as Jody, a rebellious teenager, and she was quite lovely as well.

The monsters were at once creepy and absurd. I was a bit let down by the climactic finale confrontation, though, which reduced Dalton's character to a quivering mess and depicted Holt's character as a bit of a moron. He bypasses a nearby axe for a fire extinguisher? Really? Overall, it was a thoroughly paint-by-numbers story that exceeded expectations.

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More Fantomas:

The Murderous Corpse (1913)

After the action-filled second film, "The Murderous Corpse" develops at a slower pace, which of course does not mean that it's bad, it only means that it focuses more on the mystery. This time, a young artist is accused of murder, only to be killed in his cell later. A short time after, the corpse disappear and the dead man's fingerprints starts to turn up at various crime-scenes. Fandor, the journalist suspects that Fantomas is somehow involved in this sordid affair.

As I mentioned earlier, where "Juve vs. Fantomas" was basically pure action, "The Murderous Corpse" is a mystery and thus has a more solid plot. The story of this movie is, in my opinion, excellent and the secret behind the murderous corpse is deliciously macabre.

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Monsters vs Aliens. It's a kids movie but it was a good one nonetheless. It had a few subtle and not-so-subtle jokes for the adults and older viewers to get. There were a lot of references to older alien and monster flicks. Being in 3-D was cool although I did get a bit of a headache afterwards from the adjustment back to "2-D" without the glasses.

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TOMMYKNOCKERS

I watched this over the weekend. It wasn't as scary as I remembered from when I was younger.

I enjoyed watching.

When an old 'thing' is found by Bobbie, and her dog Pete, strange things begin to happen. The town people begin hearing ways to invent things. They work their selves into exhaustion trying to uncover the buried object in their frenzied desire to 'become'. They start looking like crack addicts. Missing teeth and all.

An oldie, but a goodie.

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Tokyo Gore Police

Wow. Not since Snakes on a Plane has a title so accurately summed up a movie. Tokyo locations? Check. Cops? Check. Gore? Holy crap! There was lots of over the top blood and guts in this one. So much, that some viewers may gloss over the Robocop-like TV commercials and ads sprinkled throughout the film that offer some biting social commentary.

I'm just finishing watching this. The scene near the end with the multiple amputee sword-wielder fight was kind of cool. The whole movie was over the top though for sure. It's definitely in the Dead Alive or Robocop line of over the top gore and social commentary.

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One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)

Yesterday, I watched this movie for the first time and found that I enjoyed it a lot. The characters were all engaging and the actor's that played them did an excellent job. Not surprisingly, Nicholson's performance as anti-hero Randall MacMurphy was my favorite, but I also thought that Louise Fletcher did a good job when it came to making her character an antagonist you just loved to hate. All in all an excellent film, highly recommended.

Edited by Dr_Mabuse

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The Thirteenth Guest (1932)

A Shriek in the Night (1933)

Two early Ginger Rogers movies, both co-starring Lyle Talbot. Short and enjoyable. In the first, she plays the daughter of a man who left a mysterious will thirteen years earlier. Family members start dying. A mystery! In the second, she is a reporter fighting to get the latest scoop on a serious of murders. Another mystery!

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Ninja Scroll (1993)

"Ninja Scroll" is definitely one of the most violent animated movies I've ever seen; there are very few scenes that doesn't feature someone being killed in a gruesome manner. Still, despite all the violence I rather enjoyed this film. The various fight-scenes were fun to watch and the two main characters were both pretty interesting and easy to sympathize with. Not the greatest animated feature by any means, but solid entertainment nevertheless.

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